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Vacation !NEW!



He desires to relive the fun of his family vacations and holiday gatherings from his childhood. These memories prompt him to abandon his family's annual trip to their cabin in Cheboygan, Michigan (which the rest of the family secretly hated), and instead drive cross country from Chicago to Walley World, just like he did with his parents and sister. For the trip, Rusty rents a Tartan Prancer, an ugly, over-complicated Albanian SUV.




vacation



Rusty uses his airline connections to book a vacation in Paris with just Debbie and himself after sending the boys home where their neighbors will look after them. On the plane to Paris, they are seated in jump seats next to a lavatory. Exasperated, Debbie learns that it will be a 12-hour flight.


There is no legal requirement in California that an employer provide its employees with either paid or unpaid vacation time. However, if an employer does have an established policy, practice, or agreement to provide paid vacation, then certain restrictions are placed on the employer as to how it fulfills its obligation to provide vacation pay. Under California law, earned vacation time is considered wages, and vacation time is earned, or vests, as labor is performed. For example, if an employee is entitled to two weeks (10 work days) of vacation per year, after six months of work he or she will have earned five days of vacation. Vacation pay accrues (adds up) as it is earned, and cannot be forfeited, even upon termination of employment, regardless of the reason for the termination. (Suastez v. Plastic Dress Up (1982) 31 C3d 774) An employer can place a reasonable cap on vacation benefits that prevents an employee from earning vacation over a certain amount of hours. (Boothby v. Atlas Mechanical (1992) 6 Cal.App.4th 1595) And, unless otherwise stipulated by a collective bargaining agreement, upon termination of employment all earned and unused vacation must be paid to the employee at his or her final rate of pay. Labor Code Section 227.3 The California Legislature, in order to ensure that vacation plans were fairly and equitably handled, provided that the Labor Commissioner was to "apply the principles of equity and fairness" in resolving vacation claims.


Yes. DLSE's enforcement policy does not preclude an employer from providing a specific period of time at the beginning of the employment relationship during which an employee does not earn any vacation benefits. This could apply to a probationary or introductory period, and can even apply to the whole first year of employment.


Such a provision in a vacation plan will only be recognized, however, if it is not a subterfuge (phony reason) and in fact, no vacation is implicitly earned or accrued during that first year or other period. For example, a plan with the following provisions would be an obvious subterfuge and not recognized as valid:


The four weeks' vacation earned in the second year, when viewed in the context of the two weeks' vacation earned in the third year, makes it clear that two of the four weeks earned in year two are actually vacation earned in year one.


In California, because paid vacation is a form of wages, it is earned as labor is performed. An employer's vacation plan may provide for the earning of vacation benefits on a day-by-day, by the week, by the pay period, or some other period basis. For example, an employer's policy may provide that an employee will earn a proportionate share of his or her annual vacation entitlement for each week of a calendar year in which the employee either works at least one full day or receives at least one full days' pay during such week. Thus, for example, if an employee is entitled to two weeks (10 work days) annual vacation, and works full-time, eight hours per day, 40 hours per week, in the above example for each week the employee works at least one full day, he or she will earn 1.538 hours of paid vacation, calculated as follows:


In contrast to how vacation pay may be earned, the calculation of vacation pay for terminating employees (a quit, discharge, death, end of contract, etc.) who have earned and accrued and unused vacation on the books at the time of termination must be prorated on a daily basis and must be paid at the final rate of pay in effect as of the date of the separation. For example, an employee who is entitled to three weeks of annual vacation (15 work days entitlement per year x 8 hours/day = 120 hours vacation entitlement per year) who quits on August 7, 2002 (the 219th day of the year) without having taken any vacation in 2002, who has no vacation carry-over from prior years, and whose final rate of pay is $13.00 per hour, would be entitled to $936.00 vacation pay upon separation, calculated as follows:


Yes, such a provision would be acceptable to the Labor Commissioner. Unlike "use it or lose it" policies, a vacation policy that places a "cap" or "ceiling" on vacation pay accruals is permissible. Whereas a "use it or lose it" policy results in a forfeiture of accrued vacation pay, a "cap" simply places a limit on the amount of vacation that can accrue; that is, once a certain level or amount of accrued vacation is earned but not taken, no further vacation or vacation pay accrues until the balance falls below the cap. The time periods involved for taking vacation must, of course, be reasonable. If implementation of a "cap" is a subterfuge to deny employees vacation or vacation benefits, the policy will not be recognized by the Labor Commissioner.


If your employer discriminates or retaliates against you in any manner whatsoever, for example, he discharges you because you objected to the fact that your vested vacation was being forfeited and not carried over from year-to-year, or because you file a claim or threaten to file a claim with the Labor Commissioner, you can file a discrimination/retaliation complaint with the Labor Commissioner's Office. In the alternative, you can file a lawsuit in court against your employer.


Eligible employees are granted vacation at time of hire and is prorated for the year based on start date (see below). For Faculty, Academic Staff and Limited Appointees vacation is then granted at the start of the fiscal year (July 1) and for University Staff employees at the start of the calendar year (January 1).


In the resource section below UW System Administrative Policy 1210 (formerly BN 1): Vacation, Paid Leave Banks, and Vacation Cash Payouts can be accessed which outlines additional details on vacation hours.


University Staff employees who are crafts workers are granted vacation hours differently. Crafts workers will be provided vacation in accordance with provisions in UW System Administrative Policy 1210 (formerly BN 1): Vacation, Paid Leave Banks, and Vacation Cash Payouts, except as indicated in UW System Administrative Policy 1238 (formerly GEN 21) Crafts Workers.


Eligible University Staff employees option to bank vacation and/or receive a vacation cash payout is offered in December of each year. Review the Banked Leave Conversion tip sheet for instructions on how to bank your leave.


If you check the boxes for both "Only send a response to people in my Contacts" and "Only send a response to people in my domain," then your vacation reply will only be seen by people who are both in your contacts and in your domain.


For example, layoffs and lean staffing make it difficult for people doing the work to get away. Some fear that taking a vacation will make them appear less committed than coworkers. The seven health benefits of taking a vacation outweigh the stressors that can come with planning a getaway.


Stress can contribute to heart disease and high blood pressure. For both men and women, the New York Times reported, taking a vacation every two years compared to every six will lessen the risk of coronary heart disease or heart attacks.


Neuroscientists have found that chronic exposure to stress can alter your brain structure and bring on anxiety and depression. When you take a vacation, feelings of calm arise and relieve stress, which allows the body and mind to heal in ways that it couldn't if it were still under pressure.


According to a Gallup study, people who "always make time for regular trips" had a 68.4 score on the Gallup-Heathway's Well-Being Index, in comparison to a 51.4 Well-Being score for less frequent travelers. One study found that three days after vacation, subjects' physical complaints, quality of sleep, and mood had improved compared to before vacation. These gains were still present five weeks later, especially in those who had more personal time and overall satisfaction during their vacation.


Many who return from vacation are more focused and productive. Studies have found that chronic stress can make it difficult to achieve certain tasks and cause memory problems. Taking time off can be like getting a tune-up for the brain, improving your mental health and cognition.


Spending time enjoying life with loved ones can keep relationships strong. A study by the Arizona Department of Health and Human Services found that women who took vacations were more satisfied with their marriages.


The bottom line is, take a vacation if you can. When you take time away from the stresses of work and daily life, it can improve our physical and mental health, motivation, relationships, job performance and perspective. A vacation can help you feel refreshed and more prepared to handle whatever comes when you return.


For part-time employees, the accrual rates listed above are prorated in proportion to their authorized part-time hours. For example, a 20-hour employee would accrue vacation at 5 hours per month during the first 10 years. The years of service necessary to advance to a higher rate are not prorated. Using the same example, a 20-hour employee would accrue 6 hours per month beginning the 11th year of service.


Intermittent employees are unique. Intermittent employees do not accrue vacation until the completion of 1,040 hours of actual work. After completing 1,040 hours of actual work, intermittent employees begin accruing vacation for each 173 hours of actual work. Because of the inherent nature of intermittent work, intermittent employees do not have an established accrual date or established hours from which vacation accrual can be derived. The only limitation to the hours an intermittent employee can work is the total annual authorized hours for the position. Since accrual can only be based upon annual authorized hours, intermittent employees accrue vacation each 173 hours of actual work, regardless of the rate of pay (regular or premium rate) in effect when the hours are worked. 041b061a72


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